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Hurricane Sandy Preparation Tips from Tom Smith (Garden State Koi)

October
29th
PondMeister
avatar

Although it is difficult to always be prepared for the things mother natures throw our way, there are a few simple steps to take to be prepared for the upcoming storm and its after effects.
 
Keep in mind that animals have their own survival instincts to handle these storms so we will focus on several of the ‘what if’s you might encounter.

Power Outage 

If the power goes out, the largest concern becomes oxygen for the fish.  One factor that is in our favor is that the water in your pond is relatively cool right now.  Colder water holds oxygen very well.   Note: most ponds fish populations will be fine with a power outage due to the cold water.  You will want to watch your fish closely to see if they are gasping at the surface.   This is an indication that the fish are stressed and struggling for oxygen.  You will want to take immediate steps to add oxygen to your pond.   A small air pump will provide the necessary oxygen to keep your fish alive.  The problem is what to plug it in to.   If you have a generator – great.   A battery back up unit will also run a small air pump for several hours.   Some customers use an AC/DC adapter and run it off of their car.   All of these are great solutions.   In case of severe emergency and lack of oxygen, hydrogen peroxide can be added to the pond to add additional oxygen molecules.  One pint per thousand gallons will keep fish alive for several hours.  Be careful not to overdose.   In the case of HP, more is not better.

Falling Trees/Branches 

With strong winds, pond owners can expect falling branches or even uprooted trees around their pond.   In some cases the branches can puncture your pond’s liner.   When and if this happens, wait to remove the branch.   In some cases the branch will keep the liner plugged and from losing water.  It also gives you the exact location as to where the hole is located.   These holes are easy to patch and repair.

Waterfall & High Winds

My suggestion is to turn off waterfalls that are used just for decorations.   The high winds of Hurricane Sandy can and will blow much of the water cascading over your waterfall outside the pond and can drain your system in a few short hours.  If you use your waterfall as the sole method for oxygen in the pond, keep it running for the safety of your fish.

Blowing Leaves/Nets

Because of the timing of this event, there will be tons of leaves blowing around your yard and into your pond.   At your earliest convenience, I suggest removing these leaves so they don’t create a long term problem.   I would expect leaf nets to be full and some tenting to be collapsed after this event, but with a little clean up most ponds will bounce back and be fine for the winter.   If you need help removing leaves, feel free to give us a call and our maintenance crew can provide assistance.

Catastrophic Pond Damage

Garden State Koi has several open tanks set up for customers that might experience severe adn catatrophic pond damage from the storm.   We are prepared to move and hold your fish in the following cases: house collapse, pond collapse, severe pond leak wherein the pond cannot hold water, etc.   Note: Power outage is not considered catastrophic although the results from losing power for an extended period of time can create a catastrophic situation for your fish – please be prepared to add oxygen to your pond.

Technical Support

I will be available on my cell phone for anyone that needs technical assistance throughout the storm.   Please feel free to give me a call if you need help with your pond, fish or a catastrophic situation.   We will be closed starting Monday afternoon at 12:00.   We do not anticipate opening again until Wednesday morning – but that might be in question depending on the damage in our area.

Please keep safe during this unprecedented storm!!!
Thomas Smith
Garden State Koi & Aquatic Center

845-629-8662  (Emergency Cell Phone)


date Posted on: Monday, October 29th, 2012 at 7:43 am
Category Pond News.
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  • Stacey Keltch

    We had a massive snow/ice storm on Christmas day, it trashed our waterfall causing a squirt of water around a tear in the liner. The pond itself is concrete with a liner that is necessary to prevent leaks. It suffered damage as well since the water level is unsustainable higher than a certain point. We haven’t seen fish in forever, but we’re keeping the pump going anyway in case there are survivors in hiding.

    We’re in Arkansas so there aren’t that many pond repair people that know what they’re doing. The estimates we’re getting are nothing short of insane. Insurance coverage so far is a pittance.

    We’ve got to get a new liner for the pond and waterfall. The bids for the liners alone have nothing to do with the prices you offer. Just like you, these people are in business to make money, but some of this is price gouging.

    We talked earlier, but I blew off the project. I’ll resend that email because it has predisaster photos attached.

    My hope is to but the liner separately, and then negotiate the cost of the work.

    Do you have any advice?

    Thanks so much.

  • http://www.pondpro2000.com/why_pondpro.html Koi Pond Maintenance

    Nice work on your blog. My husband might get transferred in December so we are planning to build a new pond in our backyard.